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Nonelectrolytes- Nonelectrolytes, Examples, Electrolytes and Nonelectrolytes, Practice Problems and FAQs

Nonelectrolytes- Nonelectrolytes, Examples, Electrolytes and Nonelectrolytes, Practice Problems and FAQs

Do you know what to give immediately to a week or a fainting person and a person suffering from diarrhea and why? The answer is glucose and electrolytes(a mixture of salts) respectively. The week people need energy and glucose is broken up by the body to release required energy immediately to the weak person. Diarrhea person losses a lot of water from the body and along with vital salts. The electrolyte replaces the salts lost with water during dehydration and restores the salt balance essential for the body function. Glucose is called a nonelectrolytes while the salts are called electrolytes. Do you know the the difference?

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Let us go over these nonelectrolyte materials in greater detail.

Table of Contents

  • Nonelectrolytes and Electrolytes
  • Examples related to nonelectrolytes
  • How do Electrolytes differ from nonelectrolytes?
  • Practice Problems
  • Frequently Asked Questions

Nonelectrolytes and Electrolytes

Nonelectrolytes are substances that do not have a distinct ionic nature either in its molecular form or in an aqueous solution. They are mostly covalent molecules. Because of their covalent nature, they do not readily dissociate into ions in their melt or dissolved states. Such substances are typically poor conductors of electricity. It is not uncommon for nonelectrolyte solutions to act as electric current insulators.

Electrolytes, on the other hand, are substances that are made up of cations and anions and dissociate into free mobile ions in solutions or in aqueous media. Because of the presence of free ions in the melt or such solutions, they are excellent electrical conductors.

Examples related to nonelectrolytes

A typical nonelectrolyte is glucose, a sugar with a chemical formula C6H12O6. Glucose (also known as sugar) dissolves easily in water, but because it does not dissociate into ions within the solution, it is classified as a nonelectrolyte. As a result, glucose-containing solutions are not electrical conductors.

See, sugar is a pure covalent compound and does not dissociate into ions, though the whole molecule forms strong hydrogen bonds with water.

Ethyl alcohol is another important example of a nonelectrolyte (also known as ethanol). When dissolved in water, this organic compound does not dissociate into any ions.

Naphthalene balls, also known as mothballs, are classified as nonelectrolytes. The chemical composition of naphthalene balls is similar to two benzene rings fused together; however, because naphthalene is nonpolar in nature, it cannot ionize in water. As a result, it is also a nonelectrolyte.

Acetone is also known as propanone. Acetone is commonly found in nail polishes, paint thinners, and a variety of other products. Acetone molecules do not dissociate as ions when dissolved in water, so they are classified as nonelectrolytes.

Benzene is a cyclic hydrocarbon chemical that's also non-polar. Because benzene is nonpolar, it will not dissolve in polar solvents such as water. As a result, there is no ionization, indicating that it is a nonelectrolyte.

How do Electrolytes differ from nonelectrolytes?

Chemical compounds that act as electrolytes are typically held together primarily by ionic bonds. When these compounds interact with water or other polar solvents, the ionic bonds that hold these molecules together break down and the cations and anions separate. All ionic salts have been shown to act as electrolytes.

Nonelectrolytes, on the other hand, are typically held together by covalent bonds and do not dissolve when the compound is exposed to a polar solvent. As a result, nonelectrolyte molecules are typically nonpolar in nature. Covalent bonds, rather than ionic bonds, hold nonelectrolytes together.

Practice Problems

  1. Benzene is considered a nonelectrolyte. What does this mean?
  1. They have low viscosity
  2. They are insoluble in inorganic solvents
  3. They have high-density
  4. They do not conduct electricity

Solution: nonelectrolytes are those substances that do not conduct electricity. So, benzene is the one that does not conduct electricity. Hence option (D) is correct. nonelectrolytes are not related to viscosity, insolubility, and density. Hence, the correct option is (D).

2. Which among the given substances does not conduct electricity?

  1. Sodium Chloride
  2. Magnesium chloride
  3. Glucose
  4. Potassium hydroxide

Solution: Glucose is a naturally occurring sugar. As is well known, sugar in an aqueous solution does not conduct electricity. The sugar does not break down into ions due to the strong hydrogen connections formed. Hence, the correct option is (C).

3. Which of the following substances does not conduct electricity?

  1. Urea
  2. Sodium Hydroxide
  3. Magnesium Sulphate
  4. Calcium Chloride

Solution: Urea is an organic compound that does not dissociate to generate ions. When we dissolve it in water, it does not become ionized and generate its constituent's ion. As a result, urea is an example of a nonelectrolyte.

Hence, the correct option is (A).

4. One experimental setup is created to determine the nature of the solute whether it is electrolyte or nonelectrolyte.

Observation: When a naphthalene solution is added to a beaker, the bulb does not glow.

What should the outcome of this experiment be?

  1. Ions are not produced as a result of dissociation. As a result, naphthalene is a nonelectrolyte.
  2. Ions are produced through dissociation. As a result, naphthalene is an electrolyte.
  3. Ions are produced through dissociation. As a result, naphthalene is a nonelectrolyte.
  4. Ions are not produced through dissociation. As a result, naphthalene is an electrolyte.

Solution: A nonelectrolyte is a compound that does not conduct an electric current in an aqueous solution or molten form. These compounds do not produce ions when they dissolve in water.

If the bulb does not light up, this substance cannot conduct electricity. As a result, naphthalene is a nonelectrolyte. Hence, the correct option is (A).

Frequently Asked Questions

  1. Is gold an electrolyte in terms of chemistry?

Solution: See, the electrolyte in terms of chemistry that dissociates into ions when dissolved in a solvent. Gold is not able to dissociate into ions. Hence, it is not a nonelectrolyte.

  1. Is the insoluble ionic compound CaCO3 an electrolyte or not?

Solution: CaCO3, though an ionic compound does not conduct electricity, because it is insoluble in water, and cannot dissociate into ions. As a result, it is a nonelectrolyte.

  1. Is sugar an electrolyte?

Solution: A typical example of a nonelectrolyte is glucose. Glucose (sugar) dissolves easily in water. But because it does not dissociate into ions in solution, it is classified as a nonelectrolyte.

  1. Is urea an electrolyte?

Solution: Because urea is an organic compound that does not dissociate to generate ions, when we dissolve it in water, it does not become ionized and generate its constituent's ion. As a result, urea is an example of a nonelectrolyte.

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